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House Speaker David Ralston, center, at a 2015 press conference. Bob Andres, bandres@ajc.com

David Ralston: Let Congress take a crack at ‘religious liberty’ measure

10:40 am Dec. 4, 2016

On Friday afternoon, House Speaker David Ralston joined host Bill Nigut and I for some conversation on GPB’s “Political Rewind.”

Many topics were touched, and you can listen to the entire exchange here. Perhaps most important was Ralston’s contention that an end to gridlock in Washington was a reason to give the “religious liberty” issue a rest come January – and let Congress take a crack at it.

The House

Gov. Nathan Deal stumps for Sen. Johnny Isakson at Chatham County GOP headquarters in Savannah on Nov. 6, 2016. Tamar Hallerman/AJC

Nathan Deal’s closing argument for why Georgians should back Johnny Isakson

6:28 pm Nov. 6, 2016

SAVANNAH – Gov. Nathan Deal had a parochial argument Sunday for why voters should back his pal Johnny Isakson on Nov. 8.

The governor said the incumbent Republican needs a third term in the Senate in order to continue looking out for the Savannah port expansion, a $706 million project that’s long been the subject of push and pull between Washington and the Peach State.

Deal argued that Isakson, through his seniority

Sen. Johnny Isakson, left, and Sen. David Perdue, right, campaign together in 2014. (AP photo/John Bazemore)

Johnny Isakson, David Perdue reject long-term Supreme Court stonewall

6:00 am Nov. 6, 2016

Georgia’s two senators said they will consider Supreme Court nominees based on their individual merits in the new year, effectively rejecting a strategy some Republican colleagues have floated should Hillary Clinton win the presidency on Tuesday.

Republican Sen. Johnny Isakson, who is running for a third term, said should he and Clinton win this week he will “consider who she nominates at the time she does and make a decision that’s right for

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. AP/Mel Evans

One reason why you shouldn’t expect to see Hillary Clinton in Georgia before Nov. 8: Jim Barksdale

1:20 pm Oct. 26, 2016

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has so far bypassed Georgia as part of her push into traditional Republican strongholds.

Atlanta Mayor and top Clinton surrogate Kasim Reed on Wednesday hinted that Georgia could see some more attention in the coming days. But with less than two weeks until Election Day, color us a little skeptical after reading the political tea leaves.

We start with Jim Barksdale.

Despite his deep pockets — he’s

Left to right, U.S. Senate debate between incumbent Republican U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson, Libertarian Allen Buckley and Democrat Jim Barksdale on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016 at Georgia Public Broadcasting. BRANT SANDERLIN/BSANDERLIN@AJC.COM

Barksdale’s new attack on Isakson relies on an old racial discrimination lawsuit

5:00 pm Oct. 22, 2016

Various opponents have raised this issue in the long political career of Georgia’s Republican U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson. Now, it’s Democrat Jim Barksdale’s turn.

During taping Friday of the only televised debate ahead of the Nov. 8 election, Barksdale brought out a new line of attack involving Isakson’s role in a racial discrimination lawsuit tied to his father. The Democratic challenger, who trails the incumbent by 15 points in our

Republicans David Perdue and Jack Kingston in 2014, when they were both vying for Georgia's open U.S. Senate seat.

Long before Trump, Georgia politicos paid lip service to term limits — but the needle hasn’t moved

3:29 pm Oct. 20, 2016

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump isn’t the first person to propose “draining the swamp” here in the nation’s capital. Many current and former Georgia lawmakers have paid lip service to the idea of congressional term limits over the past two decades — but the talk hasn’t translated into much action.

Term limits obviously aren’t very popular among D.C.’s political class. Who voluntarily wants to give up power?

Proponents of the idea say it prevents lawmakers