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Greg Bluestein

Why President Obama will be in Atlanta on Monday

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President Barack Obama, right, talks with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, left, following Obama's speech at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Wednesday. (AP/Susan Walsh)

President Barack Obama, right, talks with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, left, following Obama’s speech at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Wednesday. (AP/Susan Walsh)

President Barack Obama will visit Atlanta on Monday to address a conference of disabled veterans, meet with party leaders and headline a fundraiser for Hillary Clinton.

The visit, four days after the Democratic National Convention, is set to be one of the first where Obama uses his star power to raise campaign cash for Clinton this cycle. The two embraced on stage last week in Philadelphia, where Obama hailed Clinton as the heir to his political legacy.

The only public event on his schedule is an address to the 95th National Convention of Disabled American Veterans at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Atlanta. A White House official said the speech will discuss “how we can ensure our veterans receive the benefits they have earned, as well as continue expanding opportunities for our service members, veterans, and their families.”

Behind closed doors, Obama will attend an afternoon fundraiser held at the home of business executive Andy Prozes, the former CEO of LexisNexis Group, and Laura Heery, an architect and strategist. (A cool $33,400 to the Clinton campaign gets you through the door and a “photo opportunity.”)

And he’s set to speak at a Democratic National Committee meeting in Atlanta with heavyweight donors and elected officials before he returns to Washington.

Atlanta has long been a popular fundraising destination for presidential candidates, and Republican Donald Trump came to town in June to boost his campaign coffers. But Democrats hope Trump gives them a shot at turning the state blue for the first time since Bill Clinton’s 1992 victory.

Read more about whether Georgia could be a battleground state here.