At DNC, John Lewis touts his other role as comic book author

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., holds the new installment of his award-winning graphic novel on civil rights and nonviolent protest, on Capitol Hill in Washington. A comic book about Martin Luther King Jr. helped bring John Lewis into the civil rights movement. The longtime Democratic congressman from Georgia now hopes that graphic novels about his life and what his contemporaries endured to overcome racism will guide today's protesters in search of justice.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., holds the new installment of his award-winning graphic novel on civil rights and nonviolent protest, on Capitol Hill in Washington. A comic book about Martin Luther King Jr. helped bring John Lewis into the civil rights movement. The longtime Democratic congressman from Georgia now hopes that graphic novels about his life and what his contemporaries endured to overcome racism will guide today's protesters in search of justice. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
In this photo taken Jan. 15, 2015, Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., holds the new installment of his award-winning graphic novel on civil rights and nonviolent protest, on Capitol Hill in Washington. A comic book about Martin Luther King Jr. helped bring John Lewis into the civil rights movement. The longtime Democratic congressman from Georgia now hopes that graphic novels about his life and what his contemporaries endured to overcome racism will guide today's protesters in search of justice. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

In this photo taken Jan. 15, 2015, Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., holds the new installment of his award-winning graphic novel on civil rights and nonviolent protest, on Capitol Hill in Washington.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

PHILADELPHIA — The day after he was given a hero’s welcome at the Democratic National Convention, U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Atlanta, spoke to Georgia delegates about his other role as co-author of a best-selling comic book.

Or whatever you call it.

“Some people call it a graphic novel,” Lewis said at the delegation breakfast. “Some call it a comic book. But all over America, people are reading the book.” Watch a portion of Lewis’ remarks in this clip by the AJC’s Erica Hernandez:

The third installment in the series, called “March,” comes out next month. The trilogy chronicles his career in the Civil Rights Movement. The first installment hit number one on The New York Times bestseller list, Lewis’ co-author Andrew Aydin said.

Aydin and Lewis are an unlikely pair of co-authors. Aydin first met Lewis as a young aide in his Washington office.

“I started out answering his mail,” Aydin said Wednesday. “It’s a long way from that day.”

After volunteering for Lewis’ 2008 re-election campaign, Aydin said he and other volunteers made plans.

“Some folks said they were going to the beach, or to see their parents,” he said. “I said I’m going to a comic book convention.”

Lewis heard him. Over the years, Aydin said he pestered Lewis to write his own comic book. Lewis, always polite, put him off. Until one day, when, “finally, he turned to me and said, ‘OK, I’ll do it but only if you do it with me.’ And that day changed my life.”


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