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Aaron Gould Sheinin

Hillary Clinton ‘has work to do to earn people’s trust’ aide acknowledges

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Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., applauds as he watches during the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia , Monday, July 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Rep. John Lewis, D-Atlanta., applauds as he watches the first day of the Democratic National Convention with the Georgia delegation in Philadelphia , Monday, July 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

PHILADELPHIA — Even as polls have shown the race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump tightening after last week’s Republican National Convention, they have also shown both candidates to be terribly unpopular.

For Clinton, who is set to be officially nominated tonight at the Democratic National Convention, that unpopularity revolves around a problem of trust, which itself revolves around the controversies of Benghazi and her use of a private e-mail server while serving as secretary of State.

This, despite the fact that lengthy investigations ended with no official action against her. The FBI email investigation, however, certainly raised questions about whether she told the truth about how she managed that situation. Her campaign on Tuesday here acknowledged the situation.

“As Hillary Clinton has said herself, we read polls, we see that, she’s acknowledged that she has work to do to earn people’s trust,” communications director Jennifer Palmieri said at a morning press briefing. “It’s important for people to understand there are not some magic words you can say that develops that trust over night. What she wants people to know about her in the course of this campaign, look at what I’ve done, look at who I’ve represented.”

Bottom line Palmieri said, is Clinton’s message will be: “You can count on me and I will deliver for you. We’re asking for people to put her faith in her. To vote for her this election and let her prove that they can count on her, that she’ll deliver for them.”

Tonight’s session of the convention, she said, will feature people who counted on Clinton and for whom she delivered. That includes children and families who benefited from policies she championed and first-responders and 9/11 survivors.