Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, right, talks with Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., as Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015, before the committee’s hearing on her nomination. If confirmed, Lynch would replace Attorney General Eric Holder, who announced his resignation in September after leading the Justice Department for six years. The 55-year-old federal prosecutor would be the nation’s first black female attorney general. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
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David Perdue back in spotlight for opposition to criminal justice overhaul

David Perdue back in spotlight for opposition to criminal justice overhaul

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, right, talks with Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., as Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 28, 2015, before the committee’s hearing on her nomination. If confirmed, Lynch would replace Attorney General Eric Holder, who announced his resignation in September after leading the Justice Department for six years. The 55-year-old federal prosecutor would be the nation’s first black female attorney general. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
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David Perdue back in spotlight for opposition to criminal justice overhaul

Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., speaks with Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, a key backer of federal criminal justice legislation opposed by the Georgia freshman. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

David Perdue’s run for the Senate as a political outsider catapulted him into the spotlight in 2014. The rookie lawmaker is now receiving national attention for a different reason: his opposition to a major bipartisan effort to overhaul federal criminal justice laws.

His position puts him against a powerful coalition that includes the ACLU, Koch brothers and several senior Republicans with “tough on crime” reputations. But Perdue, who said he was inspired by Gov. Nathan Deal’s reform efforts on the state level, said he’s concerned the federal bill as written is too broad and would lead to the early release of violent criminals, not low-level drug offenders.

Now he’s the target of national and state criminal justice advocates, who worry the opposition voiced by Perdue and a group of conservatives intent on killing the measure in its current form will take the wind out of the sails of what’s been considered the best chance for a major overhaul in a generation.

Read the full story here.


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