Posted: 8:20 pm Friday, July 11th, 2014

Kasim Reed: In a future ATL, ‘we’ll be able to know where you are 80 to 85 percent of the time’ 

By Jim Galloway

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed at a program Friday celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act.  Kent D. Johnson, kdjohnson@ajc.com

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed at a program Friday celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. Kent D. Johnson, kdjohnson@ajc.com

On Friday afternoon, longtime Atlanta newsman Bill Nigut debuted his weekly 3 p.m. current events show, “Political Rewind,” on WRAS (88.5FM).

Front and center was Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed, riffing off his recent Wall Street Journal piece on the future of cities and what Atlanta might look like in 2050.

Many national outlets focused on Reed’s analysis of the electoral chances of Democrats Michelle Nunn and Jason Carter, and the importance of voter registration — which we covered a few weeks ago in this column.

Far more provocative were Reed’s comments on surveillance and the future city of Atlanta – the contest between public safety and privacy. Listen to the exchange here:

Below is a rough transcript:

Reed: “I’m putting it on the table to have a conversation. I mean, Bill, I don’t want to scare you, but between now and 2050, if you live in a major metro….between the cameras that we will install and between your mobile phone… we would be able to put eyes on you…for about 80 percent of the time you were moving around.”

Nigut: “You say ‘we.’”

Reed: “I mean the government. And it would have to be a choice. But if you were a single person, whether man or a woman, and when you left your house, you wanted eyes on you, and you agreed to that, and you enabled us to track your phone, between our cameras and our surveillance capability, in the future, we’ll be able to know where you are 80 to 85 percent of the time.

“That has significant public safety ramifications. But it also has very serious privacy ramifications….”

Nigut: “By then you’ll be in the private sector. Are you comfortable with the fact that government will be able to track you as an individual?”

Reed: “I’m not comfortable with it if I don’t give approval for it. But I am aware that, in terms of the camera capability, I don’t believe that we’re going to be able to put that genie back in a bottle. I think that because of the risks that are associated with terrorism, an increasingly fragile international community, that we will not be able to put the surveillance capabilities back in the bottle.”

103 comments
JessePainter
JessePainter

We send thousands of love ones over seas to die for our "Freedom", yet back at home we throw our "Freedom" away.

Disgusting...

Bernie31
Bernie31

When someone says they do want to "SCARE YOU", then they Go Ahead and "SCARE YOU" anyway! 

What good would you ever possibly think about this individual? 

Hmmmmm...Maybe....Governor?


I Don't THINK SO!

Bernie31
Bernie31

Kasim The Citizens of Atlanta would be Happy if you would not spend and waste the City Funds as YOU DO! They would also prefer to have a Mayor watch their MONEY 100% of the Time..than YOU watching them!


JediMaster
JediMaster

And...another Atlanta sports team leaves the city of Atlanta. Guess Reed doesn't realize that Atlanta is not Chicago.

sim_namore
sim_namore

Kasim needs to be put back in the bottle.  If cameras can be put up, cameras can be taken down.

Emack69
Emack69

Would it not make more sense to just track the known criminals?

Those who break the law should lose their right to privacy but those who are law abiding citizens should not have their privacy rights infringed upon.

AlwaysReady
AlwaysReady

`

Put Kasim Reed back in the bottle. 

.

ukwildcat
ukwildcat

The last six years have seen the greatest amount of government intrusion in our lives in the history of our country.  From what snacks and soft drinks you can eat, to what types of food your kids must buy in the lunchroom, to what you can drink, to what you can think.  Keep voting for people like Obama and Reed - along the (D) line, and we'll get more and more government and less and less personal freedoms.  These people think they know whats best for you and that they should run your lives and you're letting them.

JaySly
JaySly

i saw a movie once where the government implanted chips in everyone to track them and give shocks every now and then---hopefully kasim and the atl government don't do that

AuntieChrist
AuntieChrist

The right wing remained silent, or even applauded the loss of 4th Amendment rights, stop and frisk, illegal seizures of property, racial profiling, excessive sentences, and the host of other Constitutional violations that were deemed 'necessary' to fight terrorism and the 'drug war.'  The privacy of the bedroom was ceded because two people might besleeping together that didn't conform to Leviticus. Military units called Swat teams are allowed to enter homes without a warrant, because a private citizen just might have a 'controlled substance.' as if the very idea of a 'controlled substance' was not an affront to freedom.

Now they whine over their 'loss of freedom' because the government can access the data that every credit card company, google, yahoo, att&t, and scores of other corporations gather on us daily. Surveillance cameras have been ubiquitous in almost every business establishment from the Qwik Mart to skyscrapers since the 80's. Right wing judges have been issuing blanket surveillance warrants on the flimsiest of reasons for decades. Cops and DA's have manufactured 'evidence' in thousands of cases and when caught, are given a 'tsk, tsk, musn't do that' as punishment.

All of this has been accepted and applauded by the cons because their party convinced them to 'be afraid, be very afraid.'  They were naive to think that these same weapons would not be turned on them someday.

. We let them encroach on our rights and privacy out of fear, and said nothing. We now have the government we deserve.

mgt87
mgt87

Is there a right to privacy if you are in public?  Just chip everyone who doesn't graduate high school, and give them jobs building prisons, there future home.

anothercomment
anothercomment

Does this creeper, narcist Reed truely believe ha has a shot in any other part of public live after this term is up. My guess is he will join Ray Nagin at the Federal Pen in LA. We have the cancelation of the contracts at the airport, so his no longer disadvantaged Cascade Rd elite can still bid as disadvantage businesses on ten year plus contracts. He drove miller out at the airport, selected the least qualified of the three candidates . During snowstorm # 1 two years ago' he paid one of his contributors over $1,000 per ton for gravel. It should have cost $50 ton, maybe $100 ton with an emergency procurement. The totals aren't in on show jam 2013 yet. Then their is the blackmail and the kickbacks on the stadium deals, plus what he wants on underground and others.

honested
honested

It would be a substantial waste of time to bother with determining where most of us are and what most of us are doing most of the time.

A loaded bogus question with an accurate but ill advised reply.


By the way, this was the first time I heard our fearless host on WRAS and doing a great job I might add.

I miss the quirky daytime programming but the flood of additional information just might be worth it.

tomkat1111
tomkat1111

Why not just put a chip in everyone that will relay your location to a satellite ?

rustplane
rustplane

It's all something to consider as Atlanta moves towards its $1 billion infrastructure backlog financing, starting with the $250 million proposed bond issue.  We need to know what part of the bond issue will go to tracking, cameras, traffic light timing, etc.  One tracking Reed did not mention was vehicles.  Today there are license plate readers, some in the hands of bounty hunters.  There's also the issue of speed cameras and vehicle tracking.  If you think for one minute the state isn't thinking into the future about tolls on GA 400, think again.  Virtually all metros have toll roads, and the new method doesn't use toll booths, but is strictly electronic.  All the infrastructure is still there, folks.  Very simple to implement now.  Eventually, all local traffic in Atlanta will be tolled and your vehicle will be tracked to enforce payment.  Its the only way to cut down on traffic and pollution.  Look around the world and you'll find this approach.

AuntieChrist
AuntieChrist

@ukwildcat The repuppy M. Bloomberg tells you what you can eat and drink, The repuppy raygun launched the drug war with its dismissal of the 4th Amendment, and control of what you can put in your body. Your repuppy bush/cheney held people without habeus corpus. But to you and your ilk, these aren't a loss of personal freedom, they are just business as usual, and as long as you have all the guns you can carry, you couldn't care less.

honested
honested

@rustplane 

We will apparently go to any expense to avoid an appropriate increase in the motor fuel tax.

Gandolph
Gandolph

@honested @rustplane You are kidding, right?  The motor vehicle fuel tax has been increased substantially in Georgia over the last 10 years and is now indexed to the CPI with automatic increases.  So, what, you want to be Europe now?  Same delusion that Obama has.

honested
honested

@Gandolph @honested @rustplane 

You could not be more ridiculously innaccurate.

The Georgia State Motor Fuel Tax has not been adjusted since 1974 and still shares one penny with the general fund.

Just where did you dredge up that delusion?

td1234
td1234

@Gandolph Bed wetting Ed is an admitted socialist. He believes in huge taxes and the government taking care of everything. 

willbeback2u
willbeback2u

@honested 

This gas tax does change, I believe quarterly and is based on the cost of gas the previous 3months, if prices go up, the tax changes. 

The average price of a gallon of gas increased to $3.66 from $3.21 since Jan. and that increase would have resulted in a 15 percent increase in the state gas tax.

Gandolph
Gandolph

@honested @Gandolph @rustplane So, tell me why Gov. Deal had to stop the automatic increase slated for this July 1st.  I know why he did it.  It is an election year.

td1234
td1234

@honested I support smart growth. You can not build houses on top of each other. The metro area is out of water so there should be a shift for future growth to south GA where there is more water and roads already build with no traffic on them. 

willbeback2u
willbeback2u

@honested,  I do not know the exact figures but if you want to know so bad just google it. Please quit showing your ignorance and nitpicking because someone can;t give you a exact figure. The fact remains that the tax fluctuates quarterly based on the cost of fuel.

Gandolph
Gandolph

@willbeback2u My point exactly.  And, btw, see my post above to get the actual numbers.  I would suppose that a 15% increase in a tax that is currently 28.5 cents would result in an increase of around 4.25 cents a gallon, moving Georgia significantly up the ladder behind only a handful of states such as NY and Calif. 

honested
honested

@willbeback2u 

I was only pressing the point to get to what a ridiculously small amount was the point of argument.

Less than a dime a gallon while the roads crumble.

Gandolph
Gandolph

@honested @Gandolph @willbeback2u Dang, son.  Do some research.  I neither know nor care what it was in 1974.  However, the gas tax in 2009 for Georgia was 12.4 cents per gallon (49th in the country).  The gas tax for 2013 is 28.5 cents per gallon (20th in the country). I would say that that is a pretty hefty increase.  And, "The motor-fuel tax was the largest excise tax, contributing about 4 to 5 percent of state revenues. The Georgia constitution specifies that the state must spend whatever amount is raised by the motor-fuel tax on roads and bridges."


http://taxfoundation.org/article/state-gasoline-tax-rates-2009-2013


This stuff is easy to find out if you are not blinded by prejudice.

Gandolph
Gandolph

@honested @Gandolph @rustplane Again, and just my own personal observation, when I go to the beach we used to gas up in Georgia because it was so much cheaper than Florida gas.  Now, they are the same.  So, how is that not an increase? We are already on par with the State of Florida (gasoline tax), and, they don't even have an income tax.


I can only conclude that you are a liberal who thinks that taxes should be raised to the point that no one can drive and we all must resort to public transportation and electric cars.  Most liberals don't have a clue that our economy in this country runs on inexpensive and plentiful petroleum.

Gandolph
Gandolph

@honested @willbeback2u Look at the numbers.  If the increase had gone through, Georgia would have nearly tripled the gas tax in the last four years, from 12.4 cents to 33 cents per gallon.  Now, is that specific enough for you?  And, it ain't a dime.

honested
honested

@Gandolph @honested @willbeback2u 

I already knew.

So it is OBVIOUS that a 20 cent per gallon increase is reasonable to attend the transportation tasks at hand.

Or we could go to toll roads as the initial post suggests.

But transportation systems are not organic and do not grow automatically.

Having expressed a refusal to accept the to legitimate options, what is your solution?

Gandolph
Gandolph

@willbeback2u The chart that I posted indicates both types of taxes, the 7.5 cent excise tax plus the sales tax per gallon of 21 cents for a total of 28.5 cents per gallon, compared to as 2009 combined tax rate of 12.4 cents per gallon (over double the 2009 rate).  Do you get it now?

Gandolph
Gandolph

@honested @Gandolph @willbeback2u Are you suggesting a 20 cent per gallon increase from current levels?  Have you lost your mind?  People are struggling now with trying to put food on the table.  Do you work for the government, which has been the only growth industry in the last 6 years?


As far as transportation systems, and, at the risk of opening another useless discussion, the Atlanta area is not a good candidate for public transportation systems due to the nature of it's topography.  Atlanta is not condensed by natural boundaries like NYC or even Chicago.  Marta has struggled to stay afloat not just due to inefficiencies as some suggest, but because it often doesn't go where people live and work.  I see lots of mostly empty buses go by.  I live in North Fulton and have paid the extra penny sales tax to support Marta for over 40 years, but I don't have a rail line in my community. Just bus service if I care to stand in the heat, cold or rain to ride it.  But the buses don't even come anywhere near my community. Or, conversely, maybe a park and ride collection point which takes me to a rail station where I can get on a train which slowly takes me somewhere that I do want to go.  Heck, even with the traffic at it's current miserable level, I can drive there quicker and I have the convenience of going when and where I want to go, not where Marta will take me.  And, it's a lot safer, too.

I am not sure what you consider "legitimate options".

honested
honested

@Gandolph @honested @rustplane 

Tell me, since the link didn't, what would the actual per-gallon cost of the 'tax increase' our supposed Governor 'suspended' been?

Considering the only appropriate means to fund Civilization as an enemy is certainly a delusional position.

Like it or not, we are obscenely under-taxed at both the Federal and State level.

Gandolph
Gandolph

@honested @Gandolph @rustplane The link worked for me, but to paraphrase it, "increase would have resulted in a 15 percent increase in the state gas tax."

"According to a news release, every six months, the Department of Revenue sets the motor fuel tax based on an average of prices. A recent rise in gas prices called for an increase in the motor fuel tax. According to the release, this increase was part of the regular six-month schedules in law."


And, to answer your other comments, who gets to decide how much funding "Civilization" needs? You? Politicians? Well, I don't know about you, but I surely don't trust politicians to be frugal with OPM (other people's money).  As far as the Federal level, see my above comments containing the word "Europe".