Posted: 10:03 am Monday, February 17th, 2014

Paul Broun says Jack Kingston uses wrong model for conservatism: Speaker John Boehner 

By Jim Galloway, Greg Bluestein and Daniel Malloy

David Perdue, Jack Kingston

Businessman David Perdue and U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston, R-Savannah, at a first debate of GOP Senate candidates last month in Adel, Ga. AP/Phil Sears

This week, two forums will feature Republican candidates for U.S. Senate, and a pair of issues are rising up to meet them.

One touches on insurance. And the other is House Speaker John Boehner. First, the settings:

Your daily jolt on politics from the AJC's Political insider blogSix of the GOP candidates will attend a “small business roundtable” at Turner Field at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. Democrat  Branko Radulovacki will be there as well, but not his primary rival, Michelle Nunn.

A third forum for all eight Republican Senate candidates will come on Saturday in Gainesville, sponsored by the state GOP.

Now as for those pesky issues:

Last week, the Madison Project handed a fulsome Senate endorsement to U.S. Rep. Paul Broun. Among the things that made Broun “special,” the tea party group declared, was his vote against Boehner as speaker in 2013.

That was before Boehner, unable to bring his GOP caucus to heel, capitulated and offered up a “clean” bill to raise the federal debt ceiling, with a minimum of Republican votes.

Tea party groups are after the speaker’s head. From our own Jenny Beth Martin of Cherokee County, speaking for Tea Party Patriots:

“A clean debt ceiling is a complete capitulation on the Speaker’s part and demonstrates that he has lost the ability to lead the House of Representatives, let alone his own party.  Speaker Boehner has failed in his duty to represent the people and as a result, it is time for him to go.”

Broun’s congressional rivals, Phil Gingrey of Marietta and Jack Kingston of Savannah, are likely to be asked whether their support for Boehner was a mistake. (The issue is already rippling through GOP congressional races.)

Updated: Consider this grenade that Broun lobbed at Kingston today, challenging the Savannah congressman’s conservative ranking from the National Journal:

“Congressman Kingston conveniently fails to explain that the National Journal uses Speaker Boehner’s position on issues as the benchmark definition of conservative. By that logic, the more one votes with the Speaker, the more conservative he is. While we all wish that was a reliable measure of conservative, experience has taught that it’s not.”

Now, as for Issue No. 2: Last month, a bill backed by Johnny Isakson passed the Senate, putting on hold, for four years, hikes in federally backed flood insurance premiums – to give Congress a chance to adjust a 2012 law and devise some protection for homeowners and businesses from skyrocketing rates.

The issue has been roiling Louisiana politics, but has major implications for the Georgia coast as well. Businesses are demanding a fix – but tea party groups are pushing for a market-based solution. Which would mean the higher premiums.

Last week, Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., announced that the U.S. House will vote on its version of the bill next week. The content of the bill will probably be known by Friday. From the New Orleans Times-Picayune:  

One provision not likely to be part of the flood insurance bill being drafted by staff for House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., is a permanent cap on how high flood insurance premiums can go.

Some advocacy groups had been hoping for limits — perhaps 1 percent of the maximum coverage for a policy, to avoid unaffordable increases under the 2012 Biggert-Waters law. So for a $200,000 policy, the maximum yearly premium would be $2,000. Cantor is contemplating a bill that would cap annual hikes — perhaps at 5-15 percent. But that still could lead, long term, to unaffordable premiums, according to some of those pushing for a permanent cap.

The question for GOP Senate candidates in Georgia: Who do you tick off – the tea party or well-heeled coastal contributors?

***

David Perdue, the former Dollar General CEO trying to establish himself as the center-right, non-congressional candidate in the U.S. Senate race, revealed himself on a number of issues this weekend in a lengthy interview with the Marietta Daily Journal.

On Georgia’s campus-carry controversy:

“Personally, I’m a defender of the Second Amendment. I have a problem with college campuses, with the availability to underage kids there. So my first-blush reaction to that is no, I don’t agree with having guns on college campuses. I know there are some people that say, ‘No, that’s part of the Second Amendment right,’ but there’s a reason, I believe, that we have some exclusions to that.”

Perdue declared himself against abortion, but appeared to endorse exceptions for rape and incest:

“I don’t know. I don’t have a 13-year-old daughter. But I’d like to have the flexibility, you know, I’m just telling you straight up,” he said.

“… This is not a black and white issue. We need to protect innocent life, but there are situations where I think common sense needs to play,” he said.

And he appeared ready to declare same-sex marriage to be an issue that should be addressed state by state – noting that Georgia has already made its decision:

“As a senator, I’ve got to uphold that, so I support that, whatever the law of the land is in Georgia,” he said. “As a U.S. senator, I’m not going to get involved in state decisions like this. It’s a constitutional amendment. If that changes, then I will support that with the population.”

***

Marshall Shepherd, the University of Georgia professor and former president of the American Meteorological Society, was on CBS’ “Face the Nation” on Sunday morning to talk about the weather:

Said Shepherd:

“We know that climate change is happening and humans are contributing. I’m not quite ready to say that this snowstorm we saw this week or last week is caused by global warming or climate change, but one thing I will emphasize: I think we’ve forgotten how to be cold or deal with snowstorms, because we’re seeing so few of these big storms….And that probably is because of climate warming.”

***

Tim Scott, R-S.C., one of two African-Americans in the U.S. Senate, had a fundraiser and meet-and-greet in Atlanta on Sunday night.

The event was hosted by Ashley Bell, an African-American Republican and former Hall County commissioner who is expected to announce a run for school superintendent in the next week or so.

Among the attendees who posted photos of themselves with Scott on Twitter were state Rep. Ed Lindsey of Atlanta, who’s running for Congress in the 11th District, and Julianne Thompson, a prominent tea party activist.

Scott was appointed from the U.S. House by Gov. Nikki Haley to fill the vacancy of departed Sen. Jim DeMint and is expected to cruise to re-election this year.

***

The group Teachers Rally to Advocate for Georgia Insurance Choices, or TRAGIC, will hold a rally at the state Capitol on 1 p.m. Tuesday. They’re asking attendees to bring an apple with a Band-Aid on it. We’re presuming the fruit will be presented to state lawmakers – and not thrown at them.

***
CNN’s Political Ticker blog notes a post-Snowjam trend unfolding nationally.

After Gov. Nathan Deal apologized for waiting hours after snowfall paralyzed the city on Jan. 28 to declare a state of emergency, other governors have taken heed. The blog calls it the “Deal Effect:”

But worth watching now is how other governors get the message: A week or so after the Georgia debacle, Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback declared a state of emergency and shut things down well before the first snowflake.

And this past week, no fewer than eight governors issued emergency decrees well before the storms crossed their borders. If you think your governor got it right, Georgia’s embattled chief executive might deserve a bit of the credit.

***

We have movement on the immigration front, according to the Gallup polling organization:

Americans now assign about equal importance to the two major aspects of immigration reform being debated in Washington. Forty-four percent say it is extremely important for the U.S. to develop a plan to deal with the large number of immigrants already living in the United States, and 43% say it’s extremely important to halt the flow of illegal immigrants into the country by securing the borders. This is a shift from the past, when Americans were consistently more likely to rate border security as extremely important.

24 comments
DavidFarrar
DavidFarrar

The Tea Party Exploratory Committee of Georgia has established its second criteria all US Congressional candidates from Georgia must observed in order to receive its endorsement for this primary season.* 


Item 2: Term limits. 


Since Senators: McConnell, Cornyn and Roberts have become poster-children for term limits, congressional Tea Party candidates of Georgia  must promise not to run for re-election to the US Senate, if elected, and only once for the US House of Representatives.


ex animo

davidfarrar

*Item 1: Congressional candidates must pledge not to ask for or accept outside the state PAC funds, or political endorsements, during their primary campaigns (Political endorsements or donations from Georgia citizens, businesses, labor unions and/or present and former public office holders, <u>from within the state</u>, do not violate this pledge)

stopfemanowlyco
stopfemanowlyco

If you are concerned about the huge flood insurance premium increases, Join us online at Stopfemanow dot com. Stop FEMA Now is a national group of primary and secondary homeowners fighting for affordable flood insurance, for all and to delay and repeal the Biggert Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012. We have chapters in every state but need you to help us. Get facts, not rumors, come join Stopfemanow dot com.

Baumer_1
Baumer_1

So apparently Broun believes the correct model of conservatism is fascism.

Colwest
Colwest

Tea-Party-Meber4 minutes ago

Furrther Bohener shold be tryin 2 inpeach Obama 4 not bein form America and 4 that he fales us.

HEY TPM,  Your grasp of the native language is atrocious, even comical. But not surprising given your support for an idiot who thinks the world is 6000 years old.    Get an education before spouting off on subjects which you have no knowledge of.  Better yet, move to south carolina. Permanently.  And don't ever spread your racist genetics to another human.  Aloha.   

Flacons_go_2-14
Flacons_go_2-14

Furrther Bohener shold be tryin 2 inpeach Obama 4 not bein form America and 4 that he fales us. 

Flacons_go_2-14
Flacons_go_2-14

I spport Bruon. He is a ture American ahd a good christain, 

AuntieChrist
AuntieChrist

I hope someone recorded this, and marked the date and time, that a teatard said something that was actually sane and factual:

Speaker Boehner has failed in his duty to represent the people and as a result, it is time for him to go.”

AuntieChrist
AuntieChrist

It's risible to hear these repuppy candidates talk about how they are going to change the culture in Washington, that they are 'outsiders' who will be different than the clowns this state sends to DC now. Yet in every speech, every debate, every interview, all we get from them is the same old stock answers on social and fiscal issues that have been failing us since raygun: 'cut entitlements, outlaw abortion, cut taxes, keep homosexuals in a second or third class status, free market solutions, free guns with every purchase at 7/11' ad infinitum, ad nauseum. 

Here's an idea, save yourselves some time, money and hard feelings. Instead of primaries, just pick some repuppies out of the phone book and tell them they are now the official candidates for governor, representative, and Senator for the great state of  Jawja.

honested
honested

As to the 'seven dwarf's' position on the Speaker of the House, a simple question....


If you hammer-heads don't want to be part of Governing a functional, sovereign Country, why do you run for office?

If all you want to do is fantasize about 'conserrrrrrrrrvative purity', you can vie for shows on talk radio.

LDH2O
LDH2O

Oh great, cap insurance, another give-away. Why do they expect not to pay the real cost of the insurance? I bet they think we need to reign in expenses but not for their insurance premiums.

AuntieChrist
AuntieChrist

According to the right (wrong) wing, healthcare insurance subsidy is wrong, the free market is the best solution, the government has no business interfering, and it's not that one cannot afford insurance, instead it is a choice to go without it, and it is not up to me to pay for your bad choices. So, if one does not have health insurance, then they can just suffer the consequences, be it death or bankruptcy.

But for some reason this logic does not apply to the bush family's Kennebunkport beach front property, or the Kennedy's Hyannis Port property, or a $Million house on Hilton Head or Malibu Beach. In these cases, government subsidy of insurance is desirable, without it property losses could wreak havoc on the owners' financial position, they could lose their homes and suffer immense losses, ergo we must have a government backed insurance program to protect them. It is incumbent on all of us to pay for their bad choices, like building a $Million home in hurricane alley.

The rationale for the Nat'l flood insurance program was that in the event of catastrophe from hurricanes etc, the government is going to pay to restore these areas anyway, through FEMA and other agencies, so why not subsidize an insurance program that will mitigate the cost to us, by laying the risk off on the insurance companies, but still subsidizing what would be otherwise unaffordable premiums to the millionaires who build on the beach.

But again, strangely this same logic does not apply to healthcare. When a poor, uninsured person has a stroke, requiring a month-long or more stay in intensive care in a government subsidized hospital like Grady, we all pick up the tab. But according to the right (wrong) wing, this is copacetic, it is preferable to having a government backed insurance program for healthcare, because, you know, socialism, marxism, government moochers, etc etc.

Can one of you repuppies explain this to me?

DontTread
DontTread

"...Boehner, unable to bring his GOP caucus to heel..."


The representatives should be voting based on how the constituents want them to vote, not what the party directs them to do.  That's the whole idea behind representative government, and also why the forced two-party system needs to go.

honested
honested

@stopfemanowlyco  

What is the name of the group that encourages building of homes in a responsible manner, clear of flood prone areas and not requiring insurance coverage to be subsidized by the taxpayers?

Oh yeah, that would be FEMA!

Baumer_1
Baumer_1

Impeach him for what? Being different than you?

Classic teatard bigot.

Bernie31
Bernie31

@AuntieChrist- Charlie " I don't SEE a Problem" English has failed in his duty to protect the people of Georgia and as a result, it is time for him to go.”

uh....huh

satillaron
satillaron

It's not like people who live on the coast have a choice about flood insurance.  If we borrow from a federally insured institution, we are required to have flood insurance.  The coast of Georgia has not had a significant flood since 1898.  Many of us would gladly go without coverage, but the federal government requires us to buy it.  With the increases in flood premiums caused by Biggart Waters, some property owners were staring at $20,000 annual premiums for $250,000 in coverage.  The flood insurance premium exceeds the loan repayment.  Georgia pays far more into the flood insurance coffers than is paid out in coverage.  So I would say we are paying the real cost of insurance.  The flood insurance system is just broken.  And before the one-size-fits-all solution causes extreme devaluation of coastal property, we need to get the solution right.

honested
honested

@AuntieChrist  

They gave up on rational argument generations ago.

Just like the consistent failure of 'supply side', the facts cannot be allowed to get in the way of the ideology.

Charles50
Charles50

@SPaulT  Unfortunately that's part of the problem.  Instead of seizing the opportunity to snatch back things from the clowns the Dems are sitting back watching.  Maybe this election will be different.

Baumer_1
Baumer_1

Amen...but that isn't happening. They are really only representing the small portion that votes in their primary. So in a sense they are really voting the way local party activists tell them to.

Which is even worse since the geographic constituency is better represented by the national party than the primary base. Especially in this age of right-wing driven polarization.

If you were smart, and your teatard allegiance is a dead give away that you aren't, you would understand that party platforms and broad constituent interests are endogenous.

Kamchak
Kamchak

The representatives should be voting based on how the constituents want them to vote, not what the party directs them to do. 

James Bopp's purity pledge says, "What?"

Charles50
Charles50

@honested @stopfemanowlyco  Don't forget the Georgia storms about 3 years ago.  A lot of people lived in "flood plains" that were not aware of it because the maps hadn't been updated in years.  Responsibility had nothing to do with it.

Trackbacks

  1. […] position on issues as the benchmark definition of conservative,” Broun said, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “By that logic, the more one votes with the Speaker, the more conservative he is. While we […]