Posted: 10:28 am Tuesday, January 21st, 2014

State lawmaker: ‘Some’ rural Georgia hospitals need to close 

By Jim Galloway, Greg Bluestein and Daniel Malloy

legmain.0430 HS06

State Reps. Sharon Cooper, R-Marietta, left, and Allen Peake, R-Macon. AJC file/Hyosub Shin, hshin@ajc.com

The state’s failure to grasp the billion-dollar offer of Medicaid expansion from the federal government could cause more than a dozen hospitals in rural Georgia to close their doors, some have estimated.

One prominent state lawmaker says that may indeed happen — and perhaps should. From Jonathan Shapiro of WABE (90.1FM):

“There are some of those rural hospitals that need to close,” said State Rep. Sharon Cooper, R-Marietta, chair of the House Health and Human Services Committee.

Cooper adamantly opposes the health reform law and its optional expansion of Medicaid. She says some Georgia communities are simply too small for a hospital.

Your daily jolt on politics from the AJC's Political insider blog

“When your census is that low and you have hospital administration and you have to have 24 hour-a-day care and you have to have a pharmacy and all the other things that go with a hospital and your census runs at just minute number of patients then I think it’s time to look at the fact that maybe they need to go to regional hospitals,” said Cooper, who wouldn’t specify which communities she was referring to.

Gov. Nathan Deal has offered to work with some of the cash-strapped hospitals, including Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. But the problem is more circular in south Georgia: The region is losing population because there are no jobs. There are no jobs because companies are unwilling to relocate. Companies are unwilling to relocate because of a lack of health care.

Updated: Our AJC colleague Aaron Gould Sheinin noted that state Rep. Debbie Buckner, D-Junction City, took the well this morning to respond to Cooper’s comments. Said Buckner:

 “A rural hospital I represent worked very, very hard to bring itself back from the brink of financial disaster. It’s been operating for almost a year now in the black and has been providing needed care. Rural hospitals stabilize people who are acutely ill. Rural hospitals handle chronic care.

“These hospitals are a safety net more than just for health care. They are also a financial safety net for local counties. If the value of the hospital is not there for the county bonds, taxes will go up.

“Some of the very best jobs in the county will be lost. My constituents told me they felt like it was unfair for the state of Georgia to give tax credits we give to big business and not allow them to have quality local health care at their hospitals.

“We need to think long and hard if that’s good policy.”

 

***

Add another piece of legislation to the to-do list: Fulton County’s new courthouse case management system was installed in August for $15 million. But WAGA-TV’s Dale Russell discovered that names, Social Security numbers and birthdays began showing up in online records in a security lapse.

State Sen. John Albers, R-Roswell, was informed of the breach by a constituent, and Albers quickly discovered his own 7-year-old traffic ticket online with his birthday and Social Security ticket there for everyone to see.

He introduced a bill requiring clerks to redact anyone’s name and confidential information of anyone whose name appeared in court records.

“I don’t know why anybody would push back on protecting people’s Social Security number and personal information,” Albers said.

***

Albers, by the way, announced his support this morning for Barry Loudermilk in the GOP contest to replace U.S. Rep. Phil Gingrey – not a surprise, given that Loudermilk is a former Senate colleague.

***

Today could be a big day for DeKalb County. Our colleague Ty Tagami over at myajc.com reports about a big announcement in the making at this morning’s school board meeting. The head of the accrediting agency is set to meet with board members to reveal the findings of a review conducted about a year after the firm placed the district on probation.

From Tagami’s piece:

The political and financial turmoil that roiled Georgia’s third-largest school system in prior years is a thing of the past according to some hopeful observers, who believe the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools will finally erase the stain that has soiled DeKalb’s name for more than a year.

Mark Elgart, the president and chief executive officer of SACS parent company AdvancED, will meet with the county school board at 10 a.m. to reveal the findings of a review conducted last month, a year after his agency placed the district on probation. The drop in accreditation, and a SACS threat to strip accreditation altogether if school leaders failed to reform the system, plunged the district into crisis. The superintendent walked out, the governor intervened and the state supreme court got involved.

Now, officials and observers say the district of 99,000 students has stabilized and deserves to come off probation.

State and local officials are tight-lipped but we know this: Gov. Nathan Deal has scrapped plans to be at an economic development announcement in Savannah to attend the DeKalb meeting as an invited guest.

***

The state Capitol’s leading proponent of horse-racing says this isn’t the year. From Walter Jones and Morris News Service:

The sponsor of pending legislation that would amend the state constitution to allow it said Friday the timing is close, but not yet ripe.

“Tell them to hold their breath until next year,” said Rep. Harry Geisinger, R-Roswell, said of gambling proponents.

Most observers believe an election year in a conservative state is not the time to bring up a potentially controversial issue like expanded gambling. Gov. Nathan Deal is significantly ahead in the polls over his Republican and Democratic challengers, making him reluctant to rock the boat.

***

Supporters of legalized marijuana for medical purposes in Georgia will make a push at the state Capitol today. Groups that want to push the issue even further will also be there, with ammunition. From the press release:

A new statewide poll shows that 62% of Georgia voters endorse eliminating criminal penalties for possession by adults of less than one ounce of pot, and replace it with a $100 civil fine, without the possibility of jail time.

Further, more than half of all Georgia voters now support regulating the legal consumption and retail sale of marijuana for those age 21 and over. In 2012, voters in Colorado and Washington approved similar regulations in their states.

The poll, conducted by Public Policy Polling (PPP) was commissioned by state affiliates of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, Georgia NORML, and Peachtree NORML.

***

If you follow politics, you know by now that Gov. Nathan Deal on Monday told a Martin Luther King Jr. Day crowd that King deserves a presence on the grounds of the state Capitol. This morning, state Democratic party chair DuBose Porter termed the announcement “hollow.” From the press release:

“If Republicans have had an election year epiphany and want to honor Dr. King’s legacy, honor him by making significant and sincere investments in equal opportunity for our people,” continued Chairman Porter. “Honor his legacy by repealing Georgia’s discriminatory Voter ID laws, some of the harshest in the nation. Honor his legacy by expanding Medicaid to provide quality affordable health care for all Georgians. Honor his legacy by giving all Georgians the right to lead a private life, free of persecution and politicization. Honor his legacy by guaranteeing workers a living wage and a fair shot at working their way in to the middle class.”

***

The New York Times’ fascinating trip way, way behind the curtain of lavish fundraisers for members of Congress could serve as a reminder to Gold Dome watchers that no ethics reform is airtight. The key grafs:

“Congress, after a corruption scandal that involved golf trips to Scotland and other getaways paid for by lobbyists, passed legislation in 2007 prohibiting lobbyists from giving lawmakers gifts of just about any value. But as is the norm in Washington, the lawmakers and lobbyists have figured out a workaround: Political campaigns and so-called leadership PACs controlled by the lawmakers now pay the expenses for the catering and the lawmakers’ lodging at these events — so they are not gifts — with money collected from the corporate executives and lobbyists, who are still indirectly footing the bill.

“Even if no explicit appeals for help are made, the opportunity to build a relationship with the lawmakers, staff members and family — far from the distractions of Washington — is worth the price of admission, the lobbyists said. The donors and lobbyists, 50 to 100 of whom typically attend the events, generally donate individually or through a corporate political action committee between $1,000 and $5,000 apiece, in addition to paying their own hotel bills and airfare. There is no public disclosure that specifically shows how much is raised at each event, and lawmakers are generally unwilling to say.”

67 comments
Stuffy
Stuffy

Rep. Cooper should be forced to name each of the hospitals she is referring to and she should be forced to deliver that message to those constituents personally.


Kill the hospitals, kill the people, kill the jobs. Do Republicans know how to do anything but deconstruct? Yet those poor pitiful people in South Georgia keep voting for them over and over. *smh*........

BigHat
BigHat

Die, rural poor people, Die, Die, Die!

Eustis
Eustis

Anybody know of any Cities/Counties in Georgia that's worth a hoot, but don't have a hospital?

mrob
mrob

“When your census is that low and you have hospital administration and you have to have 24 hour-a-day care and you have to have a pharmacy and all the other things that go with a hospital and your census runs at just minute number of patients then I think it’s time to look at the fact that maybe they need to go to regional hospitals,” said Cooper, who wouldn’t specify which communities she was referring to.

Again, I have said this time after time that " Georgia have too many rural counties and towns that are populated by 3,000 people or less". "Sometimes separation base on so many political differences and the fear of crime and high taxes can cause state government to enlarge and meanwhile, creating enormous tax consequences, lack of population growth to create economic growth and prosperity for it's rural citizens.

Now the above quote by Cooper is referring to the "Republican" region of our great state that is poor in nature by the lack of real political representation that have left the constituents there so alone thinking that the Republican party got their back and the constituents continue to lack understanding that the Republicans "DO NOT" have their back, just their "WALLET". As the economic climate change in rural region from an industrial / manufacturing job creating region to a undeveloped, sore-eyed, economically depressed, poor, and uneducated region, the Republican turns their attention to President Obama birth certificate than the welfare and the well being of their poor constituents.

If you don't believe me, please review Georgia 2014 educational report that I posted last week on this blog and read between the line as I have. You may not accept, but you will acknowledge that there are public school systems in rural Georgia that have so many severely poor disadvantageous school districts that have 1000 students or less and over 95% of those families are living below the poorest of the poor among us for a very long time.

mrob
mrob

Consolidate the regional undeveloped counties and government to have one mayor and lower the tax base in those consolidated counties to build infrastructure to attract a educated workforce for jobs and business to come.

For example, start with a brand name casino and hotel first. This would allow taxes to fund the region to support the local area. Then sit back and watch the region growth. 

Republicans are afraid to do this and they have no idea how this would grow Georgia and lower taxes.

C'mon Jason, at a time like this, Georgia need you more than ever.

Salt-n-Light
Salt-n-Light

Join the Moral Monday rally at the state's Capitol from 4 to 6 p.m. this coming Monday, January 27th, from 4 to 6 p.m.

Does the Moral Monday rallies ever include Abortion? Just askin'

SmartAleck
SmartAleck

Look, Republicans and conservatives tried to stop---and warn-- what was going to come out of Obamacare. Well......now you have what many of you voted for. Don't blame a republican for stating the truth of what democRat leadership has wrought on the American people. 

Now take your medicine and drink your kool-aid like a nice little liberal..and try to learn something from this.

DS
DS

Another salvo in the Metro Atlanta vs. Rural Georgia battle. Ms. Cooper would be fine with rural Georgians losing their hospitals.

Of course, she lives in Marietta. She wouldn't suffer, so she doesn't care.

ewamaria
ewamaria

"Companies are unwilling to relocate because of a lack of health care" - I have heard many reasons as to why companies don't want to go to the countryside like access to highways and airports, access to a larger pool of possible (and educated) employees, more customers, etc - I have yet, in my entire life, heard that a company doesn't want to relocate to the middle of nowhere because of "lack of health care."

DontTread
DontTread

"Further, more than half of all Georgia voters now support regulating the legal consumption and retail sale of marijuana for those age 21 and over."


Apparently more than half of the voters can't see past the end of their nose.

What happens when school-age children see this going on and want to do it too?

How about when those same children become adults, and have no motivation to do anything besides drugs?  Hope you plan on supporting them.

When they don't have a job or a skill set because of their now-legalized pot addiction and resort to thuggery (burglary, armed robbery, carjacking, stealing) to support that addiction, what then?  (Maybe the "Moral Monday" crowd can invite them to live in their own residences, since they want to get rid of prisons.  It would be the "moral" thing to do.)

How about when they get tired of it and want to move on to something with a little more kick (crack, meth, acid), what then?  Are we going to legalize those too?  Why legalize one and keep the rest illegal?

What do we do about things like national defense or anything resembling an economy when the population is a bunch of zombie-like addicts just looking for their next hit?

mrob
mrob

“When your census is that low and you have hospital administration and you have to have 24 hour-a-day care and you have to have a pharmacy and all the other things that go with a hospital and your census runs at just minute number of patients then I think it’s time to look at the fact that maybe they need to go to regional hospitals,” said Cooper, who wouldn’t specify which communities she was referring to.

Again, I have said this time after time that " Georgia have too many rural counties and towns that are populated by 3,000 people or less". "Sometimes separation base on so many political differences and the fear of crime and high taxes can cause state government to enlarge and meanwhile, creating enormous tax consequences, lack of population growth to create economic growth and prosperity for it's rural citizens.

Now the above quote by Cooper is referring to the "Republican" region of our great state that is poor in nature by the lack of real political representation that have left the constituents there so alone thinking that the Republican party got their back and the constituents continue to lack understanding that the Republicans "DO NOT" have their back, just their "WALLET". As the economic climate change in rural region from an industrial / manufacturing job creating region to a undeveloped, sore-eyed, economically depressed, poor, and uneducated region, the Republican turns their attention to President Obama birth certificate than the welfare and the well being of their poor constituents.

If you don't believe me, please review Georgia 2014 educational report that I posted last week on this blog and read between the line as I have. You may not accept, but you will acknowledge that there are public school systems in rural Georgia that have so many severely poor disadvantageous school districts that have 1000 students or less and over 95% of those families are living below the poorest of the poor among us for a very long time.


If these people in rural Georgia are farming organic crops and are eating healthy meals, perhaps they do need to travel into the cities for a check up for medical evaluations and treatments until the representatives find ways to grow the region to attract jobs and people to relocate.

HarryCrews
HarryCrews

Easily accessible and available hospitals are not a sign of of a more educated populace? They are not at all a driver of industrial expansion? Time to rethink that position.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

"The state’s failure to grasp the billion-dollar offer of Medicaid expansion from the federal government could cause more than a dozen hospitals in rural Georgia to close their doors, some have estimated."

=================================================


It is morally wrong to cause these hospitals in south Georgia to be closed because of an ideological political battle which refuses to expand Medicaid in Georgia.  That is the real reason Medicaid is not being expanded, imo.  South Georgia residents, please wake up to this fact and change your voting habits from Republican to Democratic to see a positive change, both in terms of medical care, in educational funding and excellence, and in the overall economy in south Georgia.


Join the Moral Monday rally at the state's Capitol from 4 to 6 p.m. this coming Monday, January 27th, from 4 to 6 p.m.

DannyX
DannyX

Here's an idea, first thing cut from Grady is the expensive life flights that bring in trauma patients from all over the metro area.

The_Centrist
The_Centrist

"But the problem is more circular in south Georgia: The region is losing population because there are no jobs. There are no jobs because companies are unwilling to relocate. Companies are unwilling to relocate because of a lack of health care."

Democrats like Galloway go counterclockwise in their circles.  Hospital healthcare is not what drives jobs - it is an available, educated workforce.  Rural areas don't offer that unless it is agriculture related, and the automation of agriculture is a negative for jobs.

Retired-Soldier
Retired-Soldier

Ten comments and all want the hospitals to stay open. No problem, but please tell us how much in additional taxes each one of you willing to pay to keep them open.


Not willing to pay additional tax, fine. What funding should be cut to pay for the hospitals. Provide solutions if you really want to affect policy.

JohnGB
JohnGB

@Eustis certainly, for example, the ones that raise the chickens for your Chick-fil-a and the cows for your Outback Steakhouse. Those that grow the cotton for your clothing and and those that dig up the marble for your counter-tops. There are the others that mine the sand and granite for the pavement on your driveways and drive-thrus, and then there are the countless others that harvest and replant trees to build those lovely homes up around Atlanta... so yeah, there are those of us who live in places without hospitals who are worth hoot. 

BK37
BK37

@Salt-n-Light If I had to guess, most people associated with Moral Mondays feel that each and every woman should be able to make their own choices when it comes to abortion.  People are tired of right wing hypocrisy on this issue.  Folks will scream about "small government" all day until it comes to women's healthcare.  Then they want as much government as possible.

AuntieChrist
AuntieChrist

@SmartAleck Well......now you have what many of you voted for. 

Yes we have what we voted for, another 30+ million people with access to healthcare who did not have it before.

Don't blame a republican for stating the truth of what democRat leadership has wrought on the American people. 

There are a lot of comments from the repugs on this thread, none of which have any semblance of fact or 'truth.' To quote a great American, "you can;t handle the truth."


The_Centrist
The_Centrist

@ewamaria- Galloway, like most Democrats, NEVER lets an opportunity pass to increase government spending, and any excuse will do.

MoFaux
MoFaux

@DontTread "Why legalize one and keep the rest illegal?"

We already did.  It's called alcohol.  Everyone who has ever smoked crack, first got slobbering drunk.  Far more dangerous to our school-age children are mommy and daddy's legal prescription drugs and liquor cabinet.  Heck, a high is as close as the nearest gas tank or can of Scotch Guard. What is your real beef with a nearly harmless drug, because your points are all based on a 1930's attitude about marijuana's fictitious "problems"?

AuntieChrist
AuntieChrist

@DontTread

@DontTread   

  • "What happens when school-age children see this going on and want to do it too?"   

Better not let your kids watch the Super Bowl, with all those beer and liquor commercials showing folks drinking til they puke (well they don't show the puking part, nor the horrific traffic accidents that kill and maim them after their keg party).

  • "How about when those same children become adults, and have no motivation to do anything besides drugs?  Hope you plan on supporting them." 

 They'll fit right in with the 1000's of drunks driving around our streets, blind drunk from their 2 for 1 happy hour drinks, who then lay out of work the next day, or have no productivity because of their hangovers.


  • When they don't have a job or a skill set because of their now-legalized pot addiction and resort to thuggery (burglary, armed robbery, carjacking, stealing) to support that addiction, what then?

 We'll put 'em in jail with the drunks who have no skill set because of legalized liquor, blah blah blah.


  • How about when they get tired of it and want to move on to something with a little more kick (crack, meth, acid), what then?  Are we going to legalize those too?  Why legalize one and keep the rest illegal?
Good question. Why is alcohol legal and pot isn't?  You nor your 'small; gummint republicans can give a rational answer to this. You simply repeat the same "argument" you posted here, which is nothing more than describing the characters from a Cheech and Chong movie, and has no relation to reality. Your ignorance of the facts about MJ is staggering!

AuntieChrist
AuntieChrist

@DontTread   

  • "What happens when school-age children see this going on and want to do it too?"   

Better not let your kids watch the Super Bowl, with all those beer and liquor commercials showing folks drinking til they puke (well they don't show the puking part, nor the horrific traffic accidents that kill and maim them after their keg party).

  • "How about when those same children become adults, and have no motivation to do anything besides drugs?  Hope you plan on supporting them." 

They'll fit right in with the 1000's of drunks driving around our streets, blind drunk from their 2 for 1 happy hour drinks, who then lay out of work the next day, or have no productivity because of their hangovers.


  • When they don't have a job or a skill set because of their now-legalized pot addiction and resort to thuggery (burglary, armed robbery, carjacking, stealing) to support that addiction, what then?

 We'll put 'em in jail with the drunks who have no skill set because of legalized liquor, blah blah blah.


  • How about when they get tired of it and want to move on to something with a little more kick (crack, meth, acid), what then?  Are we going to legalize those too?  Why legalize one and keep the rest illegal?
Good question. Why is alcohol legal and pot isn't?  You nor your 'small; gummint republicans can give a rational answer to this. You simply repeat the same "argument" you posted here, which is nothing more than describing the characters from a Cheech and Chong movie, and has no relation to reality. Your ignorance of the facts about MJ is staggering!

BK37
BK37

@DontTread Way to hit on all the usual talking points.   The whole part about moving onto something harder always cracks me up.  

DannyX
DannyX

LOL!  A "Don't Tread on Me" Republican wants the government to control what an adult does to their own body!


That is some rant, Don't Tread, all that is missing is "legalized marijuana use will some day lead to bestiality."

Nobody_Knows
Nobody_Knows

@The_Centrist 

No so Centrist.  You are a hoot.  Conservative Clown calling himself a centrist.

LOL

Are you still using the sock puppet with the the name as a bunch of letters and numbers or have you created others? 

mrob
mrob

@Retired-SoldierConsolidate the regional undeveloped counties and government to have one mayor and lower the tax base in those consolidated counties to build infrastructure to attract a educated workforce for jobs to come.


Then sit back and watch the region growth. For example, start with a casino and hotels first.

DS
DS

@Retired-Soldier I'm already paying federal taxes for Medicaid expansion. So are you, if you're paying federal taxes. We all are---we just aren't getting our fair share in return. We're sending it to other states.

Additional taxes would be required at the state level for our 10% match of Medicaid expansion. This would be an additional 7.6% over what we would pay for Medicaid without expansion. 

I would be willing to increase my state tax payments by 7.6% to help keep hospitals open in rural Georgia and to bring $40 billion in federal funds into our state economy.

NOlongerRepublican
NOlongerRepublican

@Retired-Soldier From what I understand, the ACA would provide 100% of the funding for the Medicaid expansion for the the first three years and then gradually reduce ending at 90% of the cost absorbed by the federal government.. The medicaid expansion would keep those hospitals open. Now in Georgia we get back more money from the feds than that state sends already. Don't you think our esteemed lawmakers could find a way to come up with that other 10% without raising taxes? I'm sure they could do a user tax of some sort that those who actually use the medical facilities would pay.  And anyway there are some things that are more important than having the lowest tax rates possible...such as making sure people have access to a doctor when they need one!

DannyX
DannyX

@Retired-Soldier, every year Georgia hands out millions of dollars in tax breaks and incentives to get companies to relocate here.  Republicans claim they produce jobs, which in turn benefits the economy.  The same could be said for medicaid expansion, the economic impact would be huge. Jobs created and consumer spending would almost cover the added expense, Georgia would only be on the line for 10%.


Hospitals would be able to stay open, which is huge.  Local counties would see lower property taxes because they would no longer have to cover the cost of the uninsured.  Even if a very small tax increase is needed it would be well worth it.

BK37
BK37

@DannyX You forgot to add homosexuality and pedophilia.  

td1234
td1234

@DannyX When you progressives allow people to suffer the consequences for actions then we can talk about allowing people to do whatever they want with their own bodies. I personally do not care to take care of people that burn out their brains by the time they are 40. 

Retired-Soldier
Retired-Soldier

@DS My point is the federal government is broke number one and with this president the law doesn't mean anything as evidenced by the changes to Obamacare by the stroke of the executive pen. It might be 10 per cent today, but it could be 30 per cent tomorrow. If we ever balance our federal budget, then I might be in favor of new or different spending.

Retired-Soldier
Retired-Soldier

@NOlongerRepublican@Retired-Soldier Your comment makes it sound like a free lunch. Where is the Feds getting the money? Either from you and me or borrowing to continue to raise our country's national debt. You say 10 per cent in three years, but with the stroke of the President's pen that could change, like Obamacare changes almost daily.


Without raising taxes? Like I posed in my first post, what are you willing to cut?


Don't disagree with your last sentence, but it has to be paid for without raising debt.

Retired-Soldier
Retired-Soldier

@DannyX@Retired-Soldier Congratulations on a non-answer. Want to stop the tax breaks, then don't complain when business' either don't locate in Georgia or move from Georgia because another state will continue them. With the loss of jobs and revenue then how are you going to pay for the hospitals to remain open?


Has anyone asked the local communities how much THEY are willing to pay to keep the hospitals open? After all the are the ones that benefit the most.

The-Centrist
The-Centrist

Yeah 'cause that's exactly what Jesus would say, right?  No help for you - you made bad choices!

DannyX
DannyX

@td1234,


Lol, you are another "get the government out of my life" hypocrite!  


You said "I personally do not care to take care of people that burn out their brains by the time they are 40."  What nonsense!  Alcohol causes way more problems than marijuana. Drunk diving, serious addiction, liver disease, domestic violence, and destroyed families.  Of course you use a totally made up, non-existent, "brain dead" argument to make your case, how typical. 


Btw, how did prohibition work out?

NOlongerRepublican
NOlongerRepublican

@Retired-Soldier @NOlongerRepublican I guess I didn't explain it well enough...Georgia already gets more from the federal govt than we in Georgia put into the federal budget...and that money comes from other states who supply more to the federal government because they have higher incomes...traditionally the blue states like California, NY, Mass, etc. So that is why it seems like a free lunch...and that other 10% in three years could be taken care of with a user tax for those who actually use the hospitals...kinda like the bed tax the Republicans passed last year.

And I know things change in Washington pretty regularly but actual laws have to be passed by Congress so changes in that formula would have to go thru Congress and then signed by the Pres.Hillary will be our next Pres if she will run and she won't cut ACA...maybe she will get us to the single payer healthcare like other industrialized nations have.

Retired-Soldier
Retired-Soldier

@DannyX@Retired-Soldier That is one county taxing itself for the "gain" of something in their county. You are advocating taxing the entire state to maintain a service for a limited few. Apples and oranges.

DannyX
DannyX

@Retired-Soldier,


Certainly smaller than the tax increase Cobb County recently voted for to fund the new fancy Braves stadium.


They are all excited with the prospect of a few additional low paying part time jobs they are getting for their tax increase.

Retired-Soldier
Retired-Soldier

@DannyX How much of a tax increase, that is the question. I made a assumption that you wanted to end the tax breaks to pay for the hospitals, my mistake.

DannyX
DannyX

Retired Soldier, exactly where did I say I wanted to stop the tax incentives? 


 And I did indeed say that I would support a small tax increase to cover any cost that the added payroll and sales tax that would be produced by medicaid expansion didn't cover.  The leftover cost would be minimal, and would be well worth it.  Maybe you should try reading my response before mouthing off.

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  2. […] had come under fire since telling WABE (90.1FM) on Monday that some Georgia communities are too small to support a […]

  3. […] State lawmaker: 'Some' rural Georgia hospitals need to close The state's failure to grasp the billion-dollar offer of Medicaid expansion from the federal government could cause more than a dozen hospitals in rural Georgia to close their doors, some have estimated. One prominent state lawmaker … Most observers … Read more on Atlanta Journal Constitution (blog) […]